Adult Autism/Asperger Syndrome Assessment in Females

annarosemeeds:

This is so very helpful! I really wish I had known this in my teenage years.

Originally posted on Tania A. Marshall, M.Sc.:

Adult Autism Assessment in Females

Typically, females with Aspergers are picked up for Autism in the teenage years with depression, anxiety or an eating disorder. Some are dignosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. For adults, no-one knew of Asperger Syndrome or Autism back in their childhood. So a comprehensive early childhood and teenage autobiographical account is a very important important piece of an assessment. In addition, other perspectives from people who know the person very well are important. A comprehensive assessment of an adult can include a variety of assessment tools, depending on the person. Generally, a comprehensive adult diagnostic assessment includes the following:

An autobiographical account from earliest memories until approximately age 25 (usually 4-6 pages)
An interview exploring present day context, day to day functioning
An exploration of the reasons for an assessment
An exploration of family history, including one’s own children (if any)
A exploration into the history of mental health, previous medical, psychiatric, psychological…

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Can an Aspie Believe in an Abstract Concept?

The moon over Morocco in Epcot

The moon over Morocco in Epcot

For the first time today, I realized one of the reasons I struggle talking with God: He is so abstract.

“Just get to know Him,” my friends at school said.

Sure, but how do you get to know someone? By talking to that person and asking questions. However, I have a hard time asking questions when I am not sure of a response. Am I making up a response in my head? I did that for years. Now, talking to God terrifies me because I do not know if it is me or Him answering.

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Am I Good with People?

With my lovely friends Daniela and Claudia at training

With my lovely friends Daniela and Claudia at training

“I admire how you so easily talk with people and make friends.”

I was astonished by my roommate’s words. Is that true? Never in my life have I thought of myself as someone who attracted people or made friends easily. If anything, others saw me as a replaceable friend – good for when no one else was around but pushed aside when someone better came along the way.

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Facing My Fear with Friends

Lanterns at the resort

Lanterns at the resort

Tonight, my roommates and I went to go watch “Dreams” from a resort. Across the water, the fireworks exploded over Cinderella’s castle. Our toes wiggled in the soft sand as we gasped over the gorgeous light-show.

This was the first time that I watched fireworks willingly in years. Just ask my parents. The sound and flashes overwhelmed me. Being an Aspie is certainly not easy especially around the Fourth of July.

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Dragging Myself to a Party

Do you ever have to go to a party? I mean, most people seem to love these events. Dancing, loud beats, giggling with friends, and eating appetizers – all of these sounds appealing.

Unless of course, you do not like partying. Then the lights hurt your eyes, the beats vibrate through  your body uncomfortably, and the groups of people seem impossible to break into and join. That is how I usually view parties.

However, tonight is the big theater party. Everyone is so thrilled. I, on the other hand, want to stay in bed and read or something of that sort. Being with everyone sounds like such a chore. Well, I can bring my book and find a place to hide, right?

Anyway, I will try to make it through this party. Just one evening, right?

Unconditional Love #Autism

annarosemeeds:

I relate to this post so much. It is hard not to take things to an extreme and forget to balance life by caring for yourself. Wonderful blog!

Originally posted on Gretchen Leary:

I have always wanted to make a difference.

As a child, when I saw another child being bullied, I would sit beside them. I didn’t know how to make friends. To be honest, I’m not sure I ever will but that wasn’t why I sat beside them. I sat beside them because I felt this physical pain when I saw someone else in pain.

As a teenager, I would do random things like put my spare change on top of pay phones with a note that said “Pay it forward.” I was so determined to simply make a difference in someone else’s life. I was mocked for bringing my Bible to school, bullied for not ever fitting in….My clothes never quite seemed to be good enough. I thought I needed to be popular to have friends as I went from school to school. It never happened and I usually had…

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Social Observations From an Aspie: What Makes Guys Uncomfortable 1

Boys in The Yellow Boat

Most of the boys who were in The Yellow Boat with me last spring

As someone with Aspergers, I tend to struggle to read social situations. People chuckle and shake their heads when sarcasm goes over my head and I respond literally to questions asked. At least that means they are enjoying my confusion. In the past (and still sometimes now), people might have scolded me or been exasperated. Now, most just see me as quirky and literal.

The other day, however, a new idea came to me: what if my way of reading people actually was useful or interesting to others? Sure, I am not always perfectly accurate. Yet, my view on social situations is unique. Sometimes I walk into a room and am bogged down by the emotions. Do I understand them? No, but I certainly feel what others are going through at the time. Even when someone says something and I misunderstand it, the situation is fascinating to analyze.

Thus, I am planning to do some posts from now on about how I understand people and social situations. Maybe you will find them helpful, relatable, or simply amusing. Theses posts are meant to give you a little look into my Aspie mind. Please know, however, that I do not speak for everyone with Aspergers or Autism. These are simply musings from my own experiences.

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How Do You Respond to That?

Looking in the Mirror

How do you respond to certain comments especially when they make you question your worth?

Preparing for my audition for being a Disney character or performing tomorrow has been very stressful. Although excited, I am terrified. After all, the other girls will be thinner, prettier, more talented, and sweeter than me. That keeps repeating in my head.

Hearing the responses of my friends and family to this big event has been both helpful and disheartening.  Most people have given me great encouragement. Others promise to pray or think about me. Even my coworkers warnings about safety or horror stories all come out of a place of being helpful.

Still, I do not want to get my hopes to high. After all, this program will be amazing even if I am not a character. Sure, that is part of my dream, but I will love working attractions too. There is not a loss just because I am not cast as a princess. That is what I keep trying to remember.

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Top Ten Signs of Discontent

Me in black and white

Are you struggling with being discontent?

I am discontent with my life. Today, that realization dawned upon me. So many times, my mind turns to what is wrong with myself and the situations that I am in instead of being content with the journey of each day.

Being discontent takes root in many ways and can change with each moment. I am anxious with people but lonely alone, nervous with romantic feelings but unloved single, stressed busy but bored without plans, etc. The list of my fickle discontent goes on much longer than I care to admit.

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Why Are People So Blind to Others?

Who Will Love Me

The biggest disease this day and age is that of people feeling unloved. – Princess Diana

So many people are struggling in the world. Just think of a five people (coworkers, friends, family, etc). Then think about what they are dealing with right now. You will probably notice that most are dealing with something difficult. Those who are not currently will in the future or did in the past; either that or you do not know about their current difficulties.

If that is the case, why are people so blind to others? How come instead of reaching out to each other, we draw back in fear? Why are others so closed to seeing the pain of those around them?

Lately, this has bothered me a great deal. Whether I am congratulating others for getting into a show and they fail to ask about me, nearly in tears over confusion with my faith, or working while others chatter with friends, I constantly feel alone. When no one reaches out to me, anger boils up inside as bitterness towards the whole human race increases.

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