“You Have a Way with People.”

Drinking butterbeer

Here I am enjoying my first butterbeer.

My roommate said this amazing phrase the other day: “You have a way with people.”

“Yeah, a way of making them annoyed,” I wanted to quip. However, the negative remarks just stayed in my head as I smiled in thanks.

Her response had to do with a story I had told her about my day. Earlier that afternoon, I went to Harry Potter World at Universal Studios for the first time. Stepping into Diagon Alley and Hogsmeade was truly a magical experience.

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Social Observations From an Aspie: Different Kinds of Promises

With Anna

Meeting Princess Anna who also has problems with promises

“But you promised.”

That is one of the resounding thoughts in my life. I am constantly disappointed because someone promises to hang out with me or give me a present or be there for me but he or she fails to keep to what they promised.

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“You Have Gotten So Good with People!”

Daniela and me

With my friend Daniela

The other day when I was grouping people onto the carousal – AKA herding them into a small space to count how many people will be on the next ride – which is a job that terrifies me because I need to tell guests to do something they hate doing, a fellow cast member and great friend named Amanda said one of the sweetest things ever.

“You have gotten so good with people!” She beamed. “I feel like a proud mother.”

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The Painful Beauty of Goodbye

Standing with my friend

My dear friend Casey on a day off

Saying goodbye is so difficult, yet I will not stop saying “Hello.”

This is a lesson that I have learned numerous times in my life. Meeting dozens of people in treatment and then saying farewell without knowing if they would even survive, watching employees come and go at the place I lived, being in over thirty shows with different groups of people each time – I have been forced to say many goodbyes.

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Creativity and Autism

A bridge in the Swiss Family Robinson Tree House

A bridge in the Swiss Family Robinson Tree House

In my creativity class today, we assessed our creativity. The first part looked at our personality traits that matched those of other creative people. Meanwhile, the final part of the assessment graded our creative thinking skills.

Strangely enough, I ranked fairly low on the average scale in my personality traits but in the high margin for my creative thinking skills. This made me realize how Aspergers or Autism affects creativity. Those with this type of brain are not less creative than others, but we exhibit it in a different way.

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Fantasmic is the Best Show Ever! Period!

Hollywood Studios Sign

Hollywood Studios Sign

As you maybe could tell from my title, I went to Fantasmic for the first time today and loved it. This show at Hollywood Studios was brilliant and breathtaking. I look forward to seeing it again and again.

Knowing that I can sit and watch a show full of bright lights and loud noises yet still enjoy it is wonderful. I have come such a long way. The little girl with great anxiety who could not be in crowds or watch fireworks is still me. However, I have grown and adapted.

There is hope indeed.

What Loneliness Taught Me

Selfie in mirror at Disney

Being alone can teach you about yourself and others.

“Two is a pair. Three is a crowd.”

That saying might not be true, but I have certainly experienced it at times. Children pair up, having a best friend and sometimes even a second best friend. Girls giggling with others while passing me by, being picked last for a team, roommates making plans while I watched – being alone has been an important part of my life.

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Passing Through the Change

Path in Florida

Life is full of changes in the path.

Change – what a frightening word and concept. Something that I regularly try to avoid and yet crave at the same time is change.

I Ching is quoted as saying, “When the way comes to an end, then change – having changed, you pass through.” These words hold much wisdom although they seem simple enough. There are many meanings that you can construe from this quote. Here is my perspective on what these words on change mean.

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Adult Autism/Asperger Syndrome Assessment in Females

annarosemeeds:

This is so very helpful! I really wish I had known this in my teenage years.

Originally posted on Tania A. Marshall, M.Sc.:

Adult Autism Assessment in Females

Typically, females with Aspergers are picked up for Autism in the teenage years with depression, anxiety or an eating disorder. Some are dignosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. For adults, no-one knew of Asperger Syndrome or Autism back in their childhood. So a comprehensive early childhood and teenage autobiographical account is a very important important piece of an assessment. In addition, other perspectives from people who know the person very well are important. A comprehensive assessment of an adult can include a variety of assessment tools, depending on the person. Generally, a comprehensive adult diagnostic assessment includes the following:

An autobiographical account from earliest memories until approximately age 25 (usually 4-6 pages)
An interview exploring present day context, day to day functioning
An exploration of the reasons for an assessment
An exploration of family history, including one’s own children (if any)
A exploration into the history of mental health, previous medical, psychiatric, psychological…

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Can an Aspie Believe in an Abstract Concept?

The moon over Morocco in Epcot

The moon over Morocco in Epcot

For the first time today, I realized one of the reasons I struggle talking with God: He is so abstract.

“Just get to know Him,” my friends at school said.

Sure, but how do you get to know someone? By talking to that person and asking questions. However, I have a hard time asking questions when I am not sure of a response. Am I making up a response in my head? I did that for years. Now, talking to God terrifies me because I do not know if it is me or Him answering.

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