I’m Sorry, Neighbors

Me in black and white

I’m sorry.

I am sorry, neighbors, that I look at you with terrified eyes when you try to say “Hi” while I am walking. That I rapidly turn and scurry in the other direction when I see you even begin to leave your front door. That I would rather pass by a huge black snake than you and your dog.

I am sorry, neighbors, that social anxiety seizes me and propels me away from other humans. That my heart begins to shake whenever I see a car drive by me. That I envision each person around kidnapping, torturing, and killing me.

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Drawing People In, Pushing Them Away

Mary Poppins walking away

People come and go quickly in my life.

Being in Orlando has taught me a strange fact: I draw people to myself.

Writing that means that I must admit it which is hard. Me, a people person? Me, someone who others like? Me, friendly?

Yet, it is true. Whether chatting with a stranger on the bus or the new person at work, I enjoy knowing people’s stories which they, in turn, enjoy telling. When numerous people are asking to hang out, I must admit that something I am doing (or maybe who I am????) is making friends. Strange how I have changed over the years.

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Can an Aspie Believe in an Abstract Concept?

The moon over Morocco in Epcot

The moon over Morocco in Epcot

For the first time today, I realized one of the reasons I struggle talking with God: He is so abstract.

“Just get to know Him,” my friends at school said.

Sure, but how do you get to know someone? By talking to that person and asking questions. However, I have a hard time asking questions when I am not sure of a response. Am I making up a response in my head? I did that for years. Now, talking to God terrifies me because I do not know if it is me or Him answering.

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Everyone Has a Story to Tell

Black and white photo of me

Opening up and saying your story are not an easy tasks.

Writing is simple. Just type words onto a page, and there you are. Writing.

Good writing is more difficult. Character, style, grammar, inspiration, humor, honesty, clarity, research – there are so many components to creating any type of written work – fiction or nonfiction, creative or academic, comedic or tragic. Still, with proper training and natural skills, people can begin to type on a blank document with their brain dials only turned to 50 percent.

Telling your story, however, is much more difficult. More frightening. More time consuming. And more rewarding.

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Ten Things to Say to Someone with Aspergers

The Emphatic Aspergian

The great gift of human beings is that we have the power of empathy. – Meryl Streep

Often, we discuss what bothers us or what we dislike others doing. This can bring about positive change. However, stating what we need and prefer is important too.

One of my most popular post continues Ten Things Not to Say to Someone with Aspergers. For a month or so now, I have wanted to write the opposite side of that post. What are some comments that can be helpful to someone on the autistic spectrum? Thus, this post was born. Hopefully, you will find it informative and relevant.

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Working in Customer Service with Aspergers

Tea and teapot

Some tea that I was served in Oxford

Working in customer service can be difficult for anyone. However, having aspergers or autism adds to this challenge. For a year now, I have worked as a hostess in a restaurant. This job has taught me a great deal and helped me to grow. One of the biggest lessons was how my aspergian brain affects my work, especially when dealing with customers.

Before I go any further, I want to make it clear that this is my own experience. There are people with aspergers who have never experienced these difficulties and those who had more troubles that I did not mention. Despite those differences, this post will hopefully resonate with people on the autism spectrum. My goal with this post is to bring hope, humor, and camaraderie to fellow aspies as well as show people without aspergers a glimpse of what an average day at work is for those on the spectrum.

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