Do We Ever Just Eat?

Whenever I have a meal or snack, the first thing I look for is a distraction. A movie or TV show must be on, a book must be open, or a person must be talking to me.

This made me think if I ever just eat? Does anyone simply eat without distracting himself or herself? If so, does that person experience more mindfulness and healthy/normal/undisordered eating?

Look around while others are eating. How many people are on their phones? What about watching television? Strange, isn’t it? People talk about their hunger or favorite foods. Yet, these same people seem to spend little time focusing on eating itself.

I am not sure if this is necessarily a bad thing. It just is an observation that I made. Does this contribute to disordered eating? Possibly. I am not really sure.

What are your thoughts?

Coping Skills: #87. Visit the Library

 

Books from OxfordWant to learn a new language for free? Love watching movie and don’t have Netflix? Need to use a computer or printer?

Going to the library can help in any of those situations. Not only can you do all of that, you can also find peace, knowledge, and fun.

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10 Ways to Battle Nightmares

Baby in pajamas

“Those with the greatest awareness have the greatest nightmares.” – Mahatma Gandhi

Each night fills me with terror. Sleeping, which so many people seem to love, is one of my least favorite activities. Not only does it feel like a waste of time, it also brings awful nightmares.

Perhaps I am the villain one night, killing millions of people until everything around me is red. The next evening, a friend or coworker is kidnapping me. Almost worst are the nights when people tell me how they truly feel, how much they really hate me. Sometimes that is the hardest to hear.

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Letter from a Support Person

My father and my sister Maria years ago

My father and my sister Maria years ago

I recently received a beautiful comment on this blog. An anonymous support person wrote a letter that was much more powerful than anything I could write trying to understand that point of view. Thus, I wanted to share this letter from a family member or friend of a person struggling with mental illness. Hopefully, it will touch you as much as it impacted me.

Plus, if you ever have something that you want to bring to my attention or think that I should share, let me know in a comment. I cannot promise to always blog it. However, know that I am open to hearing your voice and what you would like to see more of on this blog.

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Listaliciousness: Book Problems, Realistic Princesses, and Bradley Cooper Films

Where do the weekends go? Honestly, the days that I am not in class rush by faster than I can keep track of and enjoy. Only a few more months. That is my constant reassurance.

Anyway, this list is shorter than normal. However, something is better than nothing, right? The items are a bit silly and light-hearted, but that is what I need right now. Just a rest and some laughter.

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Recovery in the Media: #68. Henry’s Demons: Living with Schizophrenia, A Father and Son’s Story

Henry's Demons

This story by father and son tells the truth about the struggles and recovery process of schizophrenia.

68. Henry’s Demons: Living with Schizophrenia, A Father and Son’s Story by Patrick Cockburn and Henry Cockburn

Schizophrenia is a disorder that many people know about but few fully understand. People with it are characterized as crazy, murderous, vicious, impossible to interact with, etc. However, there is much more to these people than those negative conotations. Awhile ago, I wrote a review of A Beautiful Mind. For this Media Monday, I decided to focus on another recovery-focused work about suicide, this time a book titled Henry’s Demons: Living with Schizophrenia, A Father and Son’s Story.

Synopsis: What can be worse than receiving news that your 20-year-old son followed the voices instructions and tried to drown himself? Patrick Cockburn and his wife experienced this with their son Henry, who was later diagnosed with schizophrenia. This book, written by father and son, rides the ups and downs of this family’s life with this life-altering illness. Mother and father fight for their son to improve while he tries to convince the world that he is not ill. This and many other tensions fill this fascinating memoir.

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My Ten Favorites of 2014: Movies, Moments, and More

Me in front of Buckingham Palace

Me standing in front of Buckingham Palace

Over the past year, I have grown so much and been greatly blessed. There were both beautiful and heart-wrenching moments. As this last day of 2014 finishes, thinking and writing about my favorites from this year seemed appropriate.

Thus, I decided to choose ten different categories and write my ten favorites of those things. By the way, can you guess my favorite number for lists? Each list is in no specific order. Thus, one does not mean my favorite or the best. It is simply the order they happened in or how I wrote them down on the post.

1. Moments – The ones I will not soon forget

  1. Studying abroad in Oxford
  2. Writing, acting in, and touring with Theater on Purpose: Cathedral
  3. Finding a waitress/running job for myself at a movie theater
  4. Moving onto campus at school with two wonderful roommates
  5. Seeing Demi Lovato in concert
  6. Being a mother to a dying child in The Yellow Boat
  7. Finaling in speech team
  8. Receiving a job from my internship at Celebrity Cafe
  9. Tutoring people at school (many great moments)
  10. Feeling beautiful in my red dress at the film festival at school

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Appeasing the Invisible: A Poem

Surrendering a Dream

It takes a lot of courage to show your dreams to someone else. – Erma Bombeck

Appeasing the Invisible

Nothing has more power than the invisible.
It pulls at me, urging my fingers to type on the keyboard,
Hissing in my ear to play with words like play-dough,
Snickering at the plot hole that sucks my story into a black hole.

Should I ignore the invisible?
Some enclose themselves in a steel balloon.
No fiery critics arrow can puncture their flight or plunge them to earth.
However, humans cannot breathe in the elevation of these works.

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Recovery in the Media: #65. Pictures of Hollis Woods

Pictures of Hollis Woods

This novel depicts a young girl who slowly realizes the need to open herself up instead of staying locked in pain.

65. Pictures of Hollis Woods by Patricia Reilly Giff

Growing up can be a challenging time for any youth. However those in the foster system face many difficulties that those with loving families do not. Few books touch on this element as honestly yet tactfully as Pictures of Hollis Woods. Although written for children, the themes and emotions in it apply to all ages.

Synopsis: No one wants to care for orphaned Hollis Woods. Not only is she already 12-years-old instead of an adorable toddler, her isolated and stubborn temperate make her a less than ideal child. Hollis’ life changes, however, after she is brought to the home of a retired art teacher named Josie. Healing begins to enter the preteen’s life as she discovers her creative skills with Josie’s guidance. However, the elderly woman’s forgetfulness and the girl’s deep pain begin to threaten the new life for which Hollis deeply longs.

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